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New bishop in Spain

July 28, 2015. The Pope accepted the resignation of Msgr. Joan Piris Frígola, bishop of the diocese of Lleida (Spain). To replace him, the Pope has appointed as the new bishop Msgr. Salvador Giménez Valls.
World

New patriarch of the Armenian Catholic Church

July 27, 2015. On July 24th, the Synod of the Armenian Catholic Church convened in Beirut and elected the 80 year old Grégorie Pierre XX Ghabroyan as patriarch. Pope Francis confirmed the appointment and granted the "ecclesiastical communion” within a few hours. Until 2013, Grégorie Pierre XX Ghabroyan was the apostolic exarch for Armenian Catholics living in France, but he resigned due to his advanced age. He will become the successor to Nersés Pierre XIX Tarmouni, who died on June 25th.
World

New bishop in Colombia

July 24, 2015. The Pope appointed Victor Manuel Ochoa Cadavid to be Bishop of Cúcuta. Until now, he was bishop of Málaga - Soatá.
World

New auxiliary bishop in South Korea

July 23, 2015. The Pope has appointed John Moon Hee Jong auxiliary bishop of Suwon (South Korea). He was the diocesan director of the Department for Evangelization and a seminary professor.
Pope Francis

Appointments

Pope Francis has appointed Fr. Joseph Kodakallil as the new eparchial Bishop of Satna dei Siro-Malabaresi in India. Up until now, he served as the pastor of the St. Vicent Cathedral.
Pope Francis

New auxiliary bishops

July 21, 2015. Pope Francis has nominated three new auxiliary Bishops in the archdiocese of Los Angeles. They include, Msgr. David O’Connell and Msgr. Joseph Brennan from Los Angeles and Father Robert Barron from Chicago. The Pope also accepted the retirement of Bishop Gerald Wilkerson, Auxiliary Bishop for the San Fernando Pastoral Region.
Vatican

Heroic virtue decrees

July 17, 2015. The Pope has approvedthe heroic virtues of the following Servants of God: AndreaSzeptyckyj, from the order of St. Basil, Metropolitan of Halyc;Giuseppe Carraro, Bishop of Verona; Agustin Ramirez Barba, a diocesanpriest, founder of the Congregation of the Sisters Servants of theLord of Misericorida; Simpliciano della Natività, priest of theOrder of Friars Minor; Maria del Refugio Aguilar Torres, founder ofthe Congregation of Mercedarian Sisters of the Blessed Sacrament;Maria Teresa Dupouy Bordes, professed religious of the Sacred Heartof Jesus, foundress of the Congregation of the Missionaries of theSacred Heart of Jesus and Mary; Elisa Miceli, Founder of theInstitute of the Catechist Sisters of the Sacred Heart; and HerreroIsabel Mendez, professed sister of the Congregation of the Sisters ofSt. Joseph.
Vatican

Financial Report

July 16, 2015. According a financial report issued on Thursday, the Vatican City State posted a $69 million surplus in 2014. The gains were due mostly to profits from the Vatican museums and other cultural events and activities. The Holy See, reported a deficit of roughly $28 million in the report, which shows a reduction in deficit when compared to 2013.
Vatican

Wesolowski back in Vatican

July 16, 2015. Josef Wesolowski, who is accused of sexually abusing minors in the Dominican Republic, is reportedly back in the Vatican under house arrest. The former Archbishop was hospitalized a day before he was set to face a Vatican tribunal.
World

Resignation

July 15, 2015. Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of Archbishop of Passo Fundo, Brazil, Arch. Antonio Carlos Altieri, 63. Paulo Antonio de Conto has been appointed as the administrator of the Archdiocese.
World

New bishop in France

July, 15 2015. The Popehas appointed Laurent Camiade as bishop of the diocese of Cahors(France). Until now, he was the pastor of a church in the Lavardacregion, also in France. He replaces Msgr. Norbert Turini.
World

New auxiliary bishop in Germany

July, 15 2015. The Popehas appointed Udo Bentz as auxiliary bishop of Mainz (Germany). Untilnow, he was the rector of the Seminary of Mainz.
World

Vatican issues statement on Iranian Nuclear Deal

July 14, 2015. The Vatican has issued a statement regarding the Iranian Nuclear Program Agreement. Through a written statement, the Vatican stated: "It is hoped that those fruits will not be limited to the field of nuclear programme, but may indeed extend further."
Vatican

Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI returns from his vacation at Castel Gandolfo

July 14, 2015. Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI returned to Rome this morning after two weeks of rest at Castel Gandolfo. Before leaving, the Pope Emeritus blessed the city. On June 30th, Pope Francis visited him to say farewell before his vacation.
World

Appointment of Auxiliary Bishop of Seoul (South Korea)

July 14, 2015. The Pope has appointed the Rev. Benedictus Son Hee-Song as Auxilary Bishop of Seoul (South Korea).
World

Appointment of Auxiliary Bishop in Santiago (Chile)

July 14, 2015. Pope Francis has appointed as Auxiliary Bishop of Santiago (Chile) the Rev. Father Jorge Enrique Concha Cayuqueo, O.F.M., who until now was the Provincial Minister of the Franciscans in Chile.
World

New bishop in Ghana

July 14, 2015. The Holy Father has accepted the resignation of Msgr. Francis Anani Kofi Lodonu as Bishop of Ho (Ghana). The Pope has appointed Rev. P. Emmanuel Fianu, S.V.D. to replace him.
Pope Francis

Appointments

July 8, 2015. Pope Francis has appointed Msgr. José Luis Gomes de Vasconeclos, as the new Bishop of Sorbal in Brazil. Up until now, he served as the Auxiliary Bishop of Fortaleza, Brazil.
Pope Francis

Appointments

July 7, 2015. Msgr. Santiago Silva Retamales, who served as the Auxiliary Bishop of Valparaiso in Chile, has been appointed as the new military ordinariate of Chile.
World

New bishops in the Philippines

July 3, 2015. Pope Francishas nominated Msgr. Dennis C. Villarojo andFather Oscar J. L.Florencio to be the Auxiliary Bishops of the Archdiocese of Cebu(Philippines). Since 2010, Villarojo has been at the parish of OurLady of the Sacred Heart in Cebu City. Florencio has been the rectorof Saint John the Evangelist School of Theology since 2013.

Benedict XVI homily for the feast of Christ the King

2012-11-26

COMPLETE TEXT OF THE HOMILY

Your Eminences,
Dear Brother Bishops and Priests,
Dear Brothers and Sisters,

Today’s Solemnity of Christ, King of the Universe, the crowning of the liturgical year, is enriched by our reception into the College of Cardinals of six new members whom, following tradition, I have invited to celebrate the Eucharist with me this morning. I greet each of them most cordially and I thank Cardinal James Michael Harvey for the gracious words which he addressed to me in the name of all. I greet the other Cardinals and Bishops present, as well as the distinguished civil Authorities, Ambassadors, priests, religious and all the faithful, especially those coming from the Dioceses entrusted to the pastoral care of the new Cardinals.

In this final Sunday of the liturgical year, the Church invites us to celebrate the Lord Jesus as King of the Universe. She calls us to look to the future, or more properly into the depths, to the ultimate goal of history, which will be the definitive and eternal kingdom of Christ. He was with the Father in the beginning, when the world was created, and he will fully manifest his lordship at the end of time, when he will judge all mankind. Today’s three readings speak to us of this kingdom. In the Gospel passage which we have just heard, drawn from the Gospel of Saint John, Jesus appears in humiliating circumstances – he stands accused – before the might of Rome. He had been arrested, insulted, mocked, and now his enemies hope to obtain his condemnation to death by crucifixion. They had presented him to Pilate as one who sought political power, as the self-proclaimed King of the Jews. The Roman procurator conducts his inquiry and asks Jesus: "Are you the King of the Jews?" (Jn 18:33). In reply to this question, Jesus clarifies the nature of his kingship and his messiahship itself, which is no worldly power but a love which serves. He states that his kingdom is in no way to be confused with a political reign: "My kingship is not of this world … is not from the world" (v. 36).

Jesus clearly had no political ambitions. After the multiplication of the loaves, the people, enthralled by the miracle, wanted to take him away and make him their king, in order to overthrow the power of Rome and thus establish a new political kingdom which would be considered the long-awaited kingdom of God. But Jesus knows that God’s kingdom is of a completely different kind; it is not built on arms and violence. The multiplication of the loaves itself becomes both the sign that he is the Messiah and a watershed in his activity: henceforth the path to the Cross becomes ever clearer; there, in the supreme act of love, the promised kingdom, the kingdom of God, will shine forth. But the crowd does not understand this; they are disappointed and Jesus retires to the mountain to pray in solitude, to pray with the Father (cf. Jn 6:1-15). In the Passion narrative we see how even the disciples, though they had shared Jesus’ life and listened to his words, were still thinking of a political kingdom, brought about also by force. In Gethsemane, Peter had unsheathed his sword and began to fight, but Jesus stopped him (cf. Jn 18:10-11). He does not wish to be defended by arms, but to accomplish the Father’s will to the end, and to establish his kingdom not by armed conflict, but by the apparent weakness of life-giving love. The kingdom of God is a kingdom utterly different from earthly kingdoms.

That is why, faced with a defenseless, weak and humiliated man, as Jesus was, a man of power like Pilate is taken aback; taken aback because he hears of a kingdom and servants. So he asks an apparently odd question: "So you are a king?" What sort of king can such a man as this be? But Jesus answers in the affirmative: "You say that I am a king. For this I was born, and for this I have come into the world, to bear witness to the truth. Every one who is of the truth hears my voice" (18:37). Jesus speaks of kings and kingship, yet he is not referring to power but to truth. Pilate fails to understand: can there be a power not obtained by human means? A power which does not respond to the logic of domination and force? Jesus came to reveal and bring a new kingship, that of God; he came to bear witness to the truth of a God who is love (cf. 1 Jn 4:8,16), who wants to establish a kingdom of justice, love and peace (cf. Preface). Whoever is open to love hears this testimony and accepts it with faith, to enter the kingdom of God.

We find this same perspective in the first reading we heard. The prophet Daniel foretells the power of a mysterious personage set between heaven and earth: "Behold, with the clouds of heaven there came one like a son of man, and he came to the Ancient of Days and was presented before him. To him was given dominion and glory and kingdom, that all peoples, nations and languages should serve him; his dominion is an everlasting dominion, which shall not pass away, and his kingdom one that shall not be destroyed" (7:13-14). These words present a king who reigns from sea to sea, to the very ends of the earth, possessed of an absolute power which will never be destroyed. This vision of the prophet, a messianic vision, is made clear and brought to fulfillment in Christ: the power of the true Messiah, the power which will never pass away or be destroyed, is not the power of the kingdoms of the earth which rise and fall, but the power of truth and love. In this way we understand how the kingship proclaimed by Jesus in the parables and openly and explicitly revealed before the Roman procurator, is the kingship of truth, the one which gives all things their light and grandeur.

In the second reading, the author of the Book of Revelation states that we too share in Christ’s kingship. In the acclamation addressed "to him who loves us and has freed us from our sins by his blood", he declares that Christ "has made us a kingdom, priests to his God and Father" (1:5-6). Here too it is clear that we are speaking of a kingdom based on a relationship with God, with truth, and not a political kingdom. By his sacrifice, Jesus has opened for us the path to a profound relationship with God: in him we have become true adopted children and thus sharers in his kingship over the world. To be disciples of Jesus, then, means not letting ourselves be allured by the worldly logic of power, but bringing into the world the light of truth and God’s love. The author of the Book of Revelation broadens his gaze to include Jesus’ second coming to judge mankind and to establish forever his divine kingdom, and he reminds us that conversion, as a response to God’s grace, is the condition for the establishment of this kingdom (cf. 1:7). It is a pressing invitation addressed to each and all: to be converted ever anew to the kingdom of God, to the lordship of God, of Truth, in our lives. We invoke the kingdom daily in the prayer of the "Our Father" with the words "Thy kingdom come"; in effect we say to Jesus: Lord, make us yours, live in us, gather together a scattered and suffering humanity, so that in you all may be subjected to the Father of mercy and love.

To you, dear and venerable Brother Cardinals – I think in particular of those created yesterday – is is entrusted this demanding responsibility: to bear witness to the kingdom of God, to the truth. This means working to bring out ever more clearly the priority of God and his will over the interests of the world and its powers. Become imitators of Jesus, who, before Pilate, in the humiliating scene described by the Gospel, manifested his glory: that of loving to the utmost, giving his own life for those whom he loves. This is the revelation of the kingdom of Jesus. And for this reason, with one heart and one soul, let us pray: Adveniat regnum tuum – Thy kingdom come. Amen.


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