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Caritas helps over 40,000 Syrian refugees in Lebanon

2012-12-02

"Also my husband was arrested in Syria and I don't know anything about him. Whether he is dead or alive I don't know anything about him! I wish I could just get news that he is alive. I don't want anything more.”

Father Simon Faddoul is the president of Caritas in Lebanon. For almost two years, he has directly seen the effects of the conflict.  In fact, he took Papal envoy, Cardinal Robert Sarah through some of these refugee camps in Lebanon, where the cardinal met some of the refugees. 

FR. SIMON FADDOUL
President Caritas Lebanon 
 "Or the other lady who came to him in the camp and she had a four month baby, and she handed him the baby and said, please take him, maybe his life will be spared, because his father lost his life.”

Since the conflict started back in April 2011, Caritas has provided crucial help to more than 40,000 refugees, regardless of their religion. From food and mattresses to fuel and medicine. 

NURSE
"We mostly treat cases of gastroenteritis, diarrhea and malnutrition.”

But still, every day more and more refugees arrive. It's estimated that there are roughly 200,000 Syrian refugees and the resources aren't keeping up, especially now with the cold weather.

FR. SIMON FADDOUL
President Caritas Lebanon 
"The needs are growing and the resources are very limited and actually regressing.”

Christians make up about nine percent of Syria's population. Even though the conflict between rebels and the Syrian government is not a religious conflict, Christians are somewhat fearful of what the future may bring. Still father Faddoul says the conflict has affected all people. 
He says this is what a Christian man told  cardinal Sarah during his visit. 


FR. SIMON FADDOUL
President Caritas Lebanon 
"He stood up and he told the cardinal his story and told him-we all had to leave our village. We live together for hundreds of years Christians and Muslims without any problem and we still live together and now we share the same destiny-we are all refugees.”

And since there is no telling when things will get better, Caritas in Lebanon is asking people to lend their support, donations and resources.


KLH 
AA
-JM/Caritas Lebanon 
-BN