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Pope Francis

Pope Francis: No people is criminal and no religion is terrorist

February 17, 2017. Pope Francis has sent an important message to the Meetings of Popular Movements that is taking place in Modesto (California). The pope denounces the "moral blindness of this indifference”: "under the guise of what is politically correct or ideologically fashionable, one looks at those who suffer without touching them. But they are televised live; they are talked about in euphemisms and with apparent tolerance, but nothing is done systematically to heal the social wounds or to confront the structures that leave so many brothers and sisters by the wayside”.
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The government of the Order of Malta will elect the successor of the Grand Master in April

February 15, 2017. On April 29, the Council Complete of State, the Order’s constitutional body, will elect the next Grand Master of the Sovereign Order of Malta (or, as provided for in the Constitution, a Lieutenant of the Grand Master, to hold office for a year).
Pope Francis

Pope names a Special Envoy for Medjugorje

< style> February 11, 2017. Pope Francis has asked Henryk Hoser, S.A.C., bishop of Warsaw-Prague (Poland), to go to Medjugorje as Special Envoy of the Holy See. According< g> the Vatican, "the mission has the aim of acquiring a deeper knowledge of the pastoral situation there and above all, of the needs of the faithful who go there in pilgrimage, and on the basis of this, to suggest possible pastoral initiatives for the future”.

Christian airline employee wins discrimination lawsuit over right to wear cross

2013-01-15

In a 5-2 decision, the judiciary ruled that the UK courts had unfairly given greater weight to the airlines desire to "maintain a certain corporate image,” in lieu of Coptic Christian Nadia Eweida's freedom to express her religion. 


In the binding ruling, the ECHR cited that the airline itself had later amended the uniform code to allow visible religious clothing and symbols, and that before that, it had allowed members of other faiths to wear religious symbols, such as turbans, without an effect on its image. As a result, the UK was ordered to pay Eweida 2,000 euros, and to cover her legal costs. 

During the same hearing, the court sided with a hospital that asked a British nurse to remove her cross, citing "clinical safety” in the workplace. It also ruled that the religious freedom of a civil registrar and a sex counselor, who were dismissed for raising religious objections to working with same sex couples, was not breached because they refused to enforce State-mandated equality measures


RCarr 
Images: European Court of Human Rights 
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