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Vaticaleaks-2: Court charged five people for “procuring and revealing” confidential material
November 21, 2015. A Vatican Court formally charged a pair of journalists, two officials, and a secretary to one of the officials for "procuring and revealing” confidential documents and information. They are Gianluigi Nuzzi and Emiliano Fittipaldi, -who recently wrote books regarding mismanagement in the Vatican-, as well as the Msgr. Lucio Ángel Vallejo Balda, Francesca Chaouqui and Vallejo’s secretary, Nicola Maio. While all five are charged with criminal misappropriation and misuse of Vatican confidential documents; Vallejo, Chaouqui, and Maio, are charged with criminal conspiracy "to divulge information and documents concerning the fundamental interests of the Holy See and the State”. A hearing has been scheduled for next November 24th, 2015 in the Vatican criminal court.
New archbishop in Barcelona (Spain)
November 6, 2015. Pope Francis has accepted the resignation of Cardinal Lluís Martínez Sistach as Archbishop of Barcelona (Spain). He has named Monsignor Juan Jose Omella in his place. He was until now Bishop of the Diocese of Calahorra and La Calzada-Logroño.
Vatican arrests two people for allegedly leaking confidential documents
November 2, 2015. The Vatican Police have arrested two people, reportedly linked to the leak of confidential Holy See documents. They are: Msgr. Lucio Angel Vallejo Balda and Francesca Chaouqui, both of whom were members of COSEA, which stands for the Pontifical Commission for Reference on the Organization of the Economic Administrative Structure of the Holy See. After her arrest, Francesca Chaouqui was released, after giving her testimony to the Vaticans District Attorneys office. But Msgr. Vallejo Balda is still in custody. He is accused of leaking secret Vatican documents. His arrest comes just days before the release of a book which allegedly contains private conversations between the Pope and COSEA officials. The Holy See describes the release and publication of the documents as a violation of the Popes trust. The Vatican continues to investigate the source of the document leaks. It also adds that if needed, it will seek the assistance of international entities to clarity the allegations. The Vatican also adds that leaking documents in no way helps the mission of the Church or that of the Pope.
Vatican sends condolences to Putin and Russian people after plane crash
November 2, 2015. Cardinal Pietro Parolin, the Vatican Secretary of State, has sent a telegram on behalf of Pope Francis to Russian President Vladimir Putin. He offers his condolences for the recent plane crash in which more than 200 Russians died. The full text is here: Having learned with sadness of the tragic crash of the Russian airline in the Sinai Peninsula, His Holiness Pope Francis conveys his condolences to you and the Russian people. He offers the assurance of his prayers for all who have died and for those who mourn their loss. Upon the nation and all involved in the recovery efforts His Holiness invokes the strength and peace of Almighty God.

Pope tackles clericalism, gets rid of 'monsignor' title for priests


As of now, diocesan priests around the world will no longer be able to become a "monsignor” until they turn 65. Under the guidance of Pope Francis, the Secretariat of State communicated the announcement to apostolic nuncios across the world. The move is seen as the latest effort to tackle career clericalism within the Church. 

Archdiocese of Guadalajara (Mexico)
"Since the beginning, the Pope wanted to take away many things that give the Church a bad name. One of those things was this latest change. There were too many priests that, without being bishops, already had the title of monsignor.”

The Vatican said only "worthy priests” over 65 will be eligible for the honor. But the move does not affect those that already have the title.

News of the change spread quickly among clergy in Rome, the heartland of Catholicism. While some priests felt it wouldn't have a big impact, most were still supportive of the change.

Diocese of Latina (Italy)
"I think that with the times today, it's useless. It's an old title, from an old mentality. Instead, the real effect is what Pope Francis teaches us: the title doesn't matter, it's what we do and who we are.”

Pontifical Council for Culture
"We need someone who can freely change and bring the Church closer to the Gospel: where the word 'brother' becomes the key word. All titles that divide, or create the idea of a career, are not the truth of the Church. It's a good move.”

To become a monsignor, a largely honorary title, diocesan priests must be nominated by their bishop. The Vatican then accepts or rejects their request.

At one point, the Vatican recognized up to 14 ranks of "monsignor.” But after the Second Vatican Council, only three remained. Under this change, Pope Francis narrowed it down further to just one, Chaplain to His Holiness.

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