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Pope Francis

Pope Francis: No people is criminal and no religion is terrorist

February 17, 2017. Pope Francis has sent an important message to the Meetings of Popular Movements that is taking place in Modesto (California). The pope denounces the "moral blindness of this indifference”: "under the guise of what is politically correct or ideologically fashionable, one looks at those who suffer without touching them. But they are televised live; they are talked about in euphemisms and with apparent tolerance, but nothing is done systematically to heal the social wounds or to confront the structures that leave so many brothers and sisters by the wayside”.
World

The government of the Order of Malta will elect the successor of the Grand Master in April

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Pope Francis

Pope names a Special Envoy for Medjugorje

< style> February 11, 2017. Pope Francis has asked Henryk Hoser, S.A.C., bishop of Warsaw-Prague (Poland), to go to Medjugorje as Special Envoy of the Holy See. According< g> the Vatican, "the mission has the aim of acquiring a deeper knowledge of the pastoral situation there and above all, of the needs of the faithful who go there in pilgrimage, and on the basis of this, to suggest possible pastoral initiatives for the future”.
Vatican

Pope Francis advances eight new causes of sainthood

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Exhibit shows the Vatican's role in ending bloody persecution of Catholics in Mexico

2014-06-15

One of the greatest social upheavals of the 20th Century, nearly one in ten people died during the Mexican Revolution. The result was a new, anticlerical constitution and government. 

The repression of the Catholic Church lead to an armed rebellion known as the "Cristiada.” It's the topic of a small exhibit at the heart of Rome.

FR. AGUSTIN HERNADEZ
Antonianum University (Rome)
"Mexico has this phase which shows the interest of its people to defend their personal and national ideals, which they also find in Christianity.”

These front pages tell the story of this little-known chapter. They span 30 years, starting with events leading to the Revolution. It also describes  the drafting of the new constitution, approved in 1917, which limited the Church's role in society.

FR. AGUSTIN HERNADEZ
Antonianum University (Rome)
"It stripped the Church of all opportunities to carry out its duties, from its pastoral work, to education, to catechesis, which covers basically all ecclesiastic activities.”

In 1926, this crackdown escalated into full out war between the government and rebel groups fighting for religious freedom. An estimated 250,000 people died over the three-year conflict. 

As the newspaper exhibit shows, the Vatican tried to mediate several times, but was not successful. Three years after the fighting started, Pope Pius XI brokered a ceasefire.

FR. AGUSTIN HERNADEZ
Antonianum University (Rome)
"The apostolic delegate, the archbishop of Mexico, the president of Mexico and the Pope reached a deal in 1929. But the deal, as history tells us, did not end the conflict peacefully.” 

Government repression ended in the 1940, with the election of a president who described himself as a practicing Catholic. But full ties with the Church were restored only 20 years ago. 

This episode has also given the Catholic Church in Mexico several saints. In 2000, John Paul II canonized 25 martyrs of the war. Meanwhile, 14 others have been beatified.


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