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Pope Francis

Pope Francis: No people is criminal and no religion is terrorist

February 17, 2017. Pope Francis has sent an important message to the Meetings of Popular Movements that is taking place in Modesto (California). The pope denounces the "moral blindness of this indifference”: "under the guise of what is politically correct or ideologically fashionable, one looks at those who suffer without touching them. But they are televised live; they are talked about in euphemisms and with apparent tolerance, but nothing is done systematically to heal the social wounds or to confront the structures that leave so many brothers and sisters by the wayside”.
World

The government of the Order of Malta will elect the successor of the Grand Master in April

February 15, 2017. On April 29, the Council Complete of State, the Order’s constitutional body, will elect the next Grand Master of the Sovereign Order of Malta (or, as provided for in the Constitution, a Lieutenant of the Grand Master, to hold office for a year).
Pope Francis

Pope names a Special Envoy for Medjugorje

< style> February 11, 2017. Pope Francis has asked Henryk Hoser, S.A.C., bishop of Warsaw-Prague (Poland), to go to Medjugorje as Special Envoy of the Holy See. According< g> the Vatican, "the mission has the aim of acquiring a deeper knowledge of the pastoral situation there and above all, of the needs of the faithful who go there in pilgrimage, and on the basis of this, to suggest possible pastoral initiatives for the future”.
Vatican

Pope Francis advances eight new causes of sainthood

January 23, 2017. On January 20, Pope Francis met with Cardinal Angelo Amato, the prefect for the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to announce the publication of decrees for the advancement of eight causes of sainthood.

A nightmare that still haunts him...African miner shares his story

2015-07-18

His name is Héritier. He is a 26 year old from the Democratic Republic of the Congo. He visited the Vatican to share his emotional scars and to show his physical wounds. 

He lives in the Western Provinces of the country. For years, he worked in the mining industry, until a major company, the Kibali Gold Mine, bought the lands he worked in. 

HÈRITIER WEMBO NYAMA
"The company purchased the entire land. We still needed to work, so we asked the company to yield part of the land to us, but it declined to do so. We then asked the company to at least give us a  job-again it said 'no.'”
 
With no job and no prospects, he took part in a protest. The group blocked a local street with burning tires. He was injured when military forces arrived and things turned violent. 

HÈRITIER WEMBO NYAMA
"The soldiers threw me onto the fire. I burned my arm and my back. God saved me though, because I was able to escape. Even so, the soldiers arrested me and tortured me that night. In the morning the torture continued, as they took me from town to town.” 

A day after the nightmare, he was taken to a hospital. Once he recuperated, he fled the city with his family to another town named Kinshasa. But even so, he says he still faces threats. 

HÈRITIER WEMBO NYAMA
"I'm here to ask for help. I fear for my security. These people have looked for me before and I'm scared they will come back.” 

It's a story that's heard too often. The Democratic Republic of the Congo is rich in natural resources, but it's also described as one of the most corrupt countries in the world. 

Now he visits the Vatican to be a voice for the voiceless, as he shares his experience in a Vatican conference. It's a way to shed light on the dangers that come when companies are given free range to exploit resources and local communities. 


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