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Pope Francis

Pope Francis: No people is criminal and no religion is terrorist

February 17, 2017. Pope Francis has sent an important message to the Meetings of Popular Movements that is taking place in Modesto (California). The pope denounces the "moral blindness of this indifference”: "under the guise of what is politically correct or ideologically fashionable, one looks at those who suffer without touching them. But they are televised live; they are talked about in euphemisms and with apparent tolerance, but nothing is done systematically to heal the social wounds or to confront the structures that leave so many brothers and sisters by the wayside”.
World

The government of the Order of Malta will elect the successor of the Grand Master in April

February 15, 2017. On April 29, the Council Complete of State, the Order’s constitutional body, will elect the next Grand Master of the Sovereign Order of Malta (or, as provided for in the Constitution, a Lieutenant of the Grand Master, to hold office for a year).
Pope Francis

Pope names a Special Envoy for Medjugorje

< style> February 11, 2017. Pope Francis has asked Henryk Hoser, S.A.C., bishop of Warsaw-Prague (Poland), to go to Medjugorje as Special Envoy of the Holy See. According< g> the Vatican, "the mission has the aim of acquiring a deeper knowledge of the pastoral situation there and above all, of the needs of the faithful who go there in pilgrimage, and on the basis of this, to suggest possible pastoral initiatives for the future”.
Vatican

Pope Francis advances eight new causes of sainthood

January 23, 2017. On January 20, Pope Francis met with Cardinal Angelo Amato, the prefect for the Congregation for the Causes of Saints to announce the publication of decrees for the advancement of eight causes of sainthood.

Refugees in Europe: See how the Jesuit Refugee Service is helping out

2015-09-13

The refugee crisis in Europe multiplied from one day to the next. Images of people rushing through train stations as they seek asylum,  have been seen around the world. For years now, groups like the Jesuit Refugee Service have been helping families like these, move forward. 

AMAYA VALCARCEL
Jesuit Refugee Service
"We provide access to education, also psychological help because many of these refugees have mental traumas from war. We also have a service for victims of torture and legal assistance to help them go through the asylum process.”

Amaya Valcarcel works in Rome's Jesuit Refugee Service. She says it's a misconception to describe these people as migrants seeking economic profit. First and foremost, she says, they are refugees. 

AMAYA VALCARCEL
Jesuit Refugee Service
"They are refugees who are escaping from armed conflicts, persecution and violence. They don't have any other alternatives, but to flee their hometown.” 

The journey through land and sea is dangerous. For some, even life threatening. Valcarcel says, European countries should give out humanitarian visas before, so that refugees can go from one point to the other, safely. 

Another critical point, she says, is having countries within the European Union commit to receiving a certain number of refugees, depending on their capabilities. 

AMAYA VALCARCEL
Jesuit Refugee Service
"Countries are closing their borders or they've decided they are not going to let people pass through. This is a violation of the 1951 Geneva Convention.” 

With offices in Syria and Afghanistan, the Jesuit Refugee Service, states the violence and the reach of ISIS is a real threat. Helping those in need is more than just and act of mercy, they say. At this point, it's a responsibility. 

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