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Pope Francis will directly see the destruction the typhoon caused in the Philippines

It was a deadly typhoon that hit the Philippines in November 2013. This fisherman who lives in the eastern city of Tacloban took refuge in a boat that was washed ashore.  BARTOLOMÉ NOHGO Survivor of Typhoon Haiyan "This is where we stayed after the Yolanda. We stayed there for three weeks. Me and my family and my brother.â? For eight straight days, the typhoon hit Southeastern Asia. It hit the Philippines the hardest, killing roughly 6,300 people. One year later, the country is still rebuilding itself, but it will take much longer to heal personal wounds.   ALGINA LACABA Survivor of Typhoon Haiyan "The painful part was seeing my children almost drowning, but they kept holding onto the window. When I reached them, I got them to climb up one at a time to a metal rod that was leading upstairs.â? In just moments, more than 4 million people lost everything. Now thousands of them still live in refugee camps. The UN Refugee Agency along with the Philippine Government have helped 700,000 people so far.  JOEL LACABA Survivor of Typhoon Haiyan "We feel better now. And when we move to our permanent home, we will really be thankful because it's a sturdy house and we'll be far from the sea.â?  Pope Francis will travel to Sri Lanka and to the Philippines next year, in Mid January, from the 12th to the 19th.  There he will meet a group of survivors and listen to how they survived one of the greatest natural disasters in recent history. AC/PM/KLH  Unifeed VM -PR Up: GRT