We use our own and third party cookies to improve your user experience; by continuing to browse, we understand that you accept their use. You can get more information on our cookies policy.

Rome Reports

You are using an outdated browser

In order to deliver the greatest experience to our visitors we use cutting edge web development techniques that require a modern browser. To view this page please use Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Internet Explorer 11 or greater


How malnutrition is making the situation even worse in Syria

After almost five years of civil war in Syria, food supplies have been severely disrupted. It's led to a painful increase in the number of children who go hungry. A weakened healthcare system, lack of drinking water, unsanitary facilities, and food shortages have all made it difficult for children in the country to keep a nutritious diet. One baby named Alma was severely malnourished when she was brought to a hospital, but with assistance her health has drastically improved. "When Alma came to the center she weighed 3.3 pounds. By starting to eat plumpynut on a regular basis, she improved and gained weight.â? Aid organizations are trying to help children who are suffering from malnourishment, but it's difficult to keep up with the high demand. UNICEF alone is trying to reach about 1.3 million kids in the country.  SELMA AL-RIHAWI Mother (Syria) "Alma improved a lot, thanks to the doctors. They took good care of her. No more diarrhea, no more vomiting. Yes, they took good care of her.â? Not everyone is as lucky as Alma. The need for nutritional care is increasing while already strained resources in the country are pushed even further. It's impossible to help every child that's in need. Of course, the best way to fight malnutrition would be to end the war so that the food supply can become secure again. But until that happens, aid organizations like UNICEF will be doing what they can to help those most in need.    ATO Unifeed -SV -PR Up:FV