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Rome Reports

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Rome re-enacts Julius Caesar's assassination

2060 years later, Emperor Julius Caesar gets killed again in Rome this March. This was represented by Gruppo Storico Romano theater next to the excavations of the area Largo Argentina. There, in the then Theater of Pompeii, it is believed that the first major assassination happened in history. OSCAR DAMIANI Senator Cimbro "He was killed by a conspiracy of senators led by Brutus, who was his adopted son and his student, with Cassius, who was the soul of the conspiracy. It happened there, to be exact.â? It was the year 44 BC in the capital of the great empire of the time. Julius Caesar had reached a great power, but some of his enemies were in the Senate and began to conspire against him. Was this betrayal expected? GIUSEPPE TOSTI Julius Caesar "It was a hectic era in that aspect, many were killed, so I'm sure he was not at ease, but I think that he did not expect it that day. Otherwise, he would not have gone.â? It was his dear Brutus that convinced him to go to the Senate, despite that fact that a soothsayer had warned him of the danger that awaited him this time of year, the Ides of March. "The Ides of March have come, but they still have not finished.â? Some of the senators lust for power or their desires to restore the Republic resulted in the 23 stab wounds that Julius Caesar endeared. Although there was one stab wound in particular, as the story goes, that hurt him more than any other.  "You too, Brutus, my son?â? PAOLO ZILLI Curio (faithful Senator of Julius Caesar) "His followers did not know about this conspiracy. Then we got angry with the murderers because Julius Caesar was more admired than you might think. He was an extraordinary man who has bequeathed many ideas, even many years later, for interior and foreign policy.â? His story has been told thousands of times before, from the famous Shakespearean play to the stories of Asterix. Rarely, however, there is an opportunity to see it represented in the actual geography of where it took place.