We use our own and third party cookies to improve your user experience; by continuing to browse, we understand that you accept their use. You can get more information on our cookies policy.

Rome Reports

You are using an outdated browser

In order to deliver the greatest experience to our visitors we use cutting edge web development techniques that require a modern browser. To view this page please use Google Chrome, Mozilla Firefox or Internet Explorer 11 or greater


Coliseum celebrates the Edict of Milan with an exhibit on Emperor Constantine

MARIAROSARIA BARBERA Director, Archeological Heritage (Rome) "This exhibit focuses on Constantine, Helena and the imperial court. It describes the progress Chrstianity made thanks to the emperor and how this religion evolved during the following centuries.â? Among the various artifacts are coins, mosaics and jewelery, and one of the most interesting sections focuses on Constantine's mother, Saint Helena. But the most outstanding part of the exhibit is the one devoted to the 'Chrismon', the monogram combining the initials of the word Christ in Greek.   MARIAROSARIA BARBERA Director, Archeological Heritage (Rome) "It explains how the symbol of Christianity was born. For us, it is the Cross, but it wasn't always like that. The Cross was a symbol of infamy, it was the scaffold were prisoners were executed. The symbol itself evolved. It is interesting to see how it slowly changed into a sign for victory. A victory by someone who had been crucified; that was a completely revolutionary concept back then.â? The exhibited artworks come from various museums and institutions, such as Rome's Capitoline Museums, the British Museum, the French National Library or the National Gallery in Washington. Visitors to the Coliseum will be able to see "Costantino 313 ADâ? until September 15th.   VIC /  BB RR -JM -BN Up:SCar