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New documentary sheds light on child trafficking in Africa

"One day we were at home, and my father told me we were going to Nigeria. There was a woman there, and my father sold me. When he took the money he told me to wait, that he was going to buy bread. I said nothing. And my father left, ran away. I was afraid.â? Ranchidi and Jules are at the center of the documentary "I am not for sale.â? These kids were sold, exploited and mistreated. Their history reflects the state of more than one million boys and girls trafficked around the world. JUAN JOSE GOMEZ SERRANO Salesian Missionary "Unfortunately, we have taken in children that have been sold for 20,000 francs, or about 30 euros.â? Salesian Missions produced the documentary to show the problem they witness first hand. The missionary group, tied to the order of that same name, works actively with victims of sexual abuse, exploitation and forced labor. JUAN JOSE GOMEZ SERRANO Salesian Missionary "These kids, when they leave the country, they don't know another language. They don't have any family, and so they feel worthless, they have no rights. And in a foreign country, anyone can do whatever they want with this kids.â? The group rescues child from human trafficking rings, through a network of lookouts along the borders, help hotlines, and safe houses. But aside from exposing the problem, their documentary also shows that not all is lost: Rachidi and Jules  both recovered part of their lost childhoods thanks to the work of those who fight trafficking. MZ SALESIAN MISSIONS  FA -PR Up: MZ