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Rome Reports

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New statue of the man from the Shroud of Turin unveiled


The Shroud of Turin is a centuries-old piece of cloth believed to have been used to wrap Christ body when placed in the tomb. According to tradition, the cloth contains the imprint of Christ's body.

After studying and constructing a statue of the man from the Shroud, sculptor Sergio Rodella, wrapped a copy of the cloth around the model to see if it accurately matches in its depiction of the man.

Ivan Marsura, Director of the Museum of Popes, says many other models hypothesizing the possible man from the Shroud have been more artistic than scientific. 

According to Ivan, this new statue supports centuries of studies, and also may help to understand if the Shroud is a fake or a real relic. 

IVAN MARSURA
Director of the Museum of Popes
“I can say that for the first time everything practically matches between the Shroud of Turin and this statue.”

The construction of this statue has even helped historians obtain new information about the man from the Shroud of Turin. 

IVAN MARSURA
Director of the Museum of Popes
“The man of the shroud had semi-paralysis. The hole for the nails is not on the pulse, but on the hands.”

The statue was constructed after more than two years of anatomical studies. Three times Rodella was forced to demolish his model and rework it. This was to ensure the most accurate representation of the man from the Shroud. 

Sergio first constructed an iron skeleton model and used virtual reconstruction with computer-aided design. 

He even used negative photographs of the Shroud, mathematical grids and transparent paper to more precisely identify the wounds and scourges this man suffered. 

They hope to produce replicas of the original statue in four different materials, plaster, marble, bronze and wood to distribute to churches across the globe. 

The exhibition was recently on tour in Rome and Sergio plans to take it around the world. It also includes original photographs of the Shroud of Turin as well as relics of Christ's cross, blood, crown of thorns, a piece from the Shroud and other artifacts.