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First phase of beatification process comes to end for Chiara Lubich


The first phase of the beatification process has just ended for Chiara Lubich, founder of the Focolare Movement.

The bishop of the diocese where she died 11 years ago concluded the investigations of her writings. The investigation also looked at a compilation of testimonies that concretely show the sanctity of her life.

The documents will now be sent to the Vatican for examination. After much review, the Congregation for the Causes of Saints will decide if Christian values are evident enough in her life to present her cause to the pope.

RAFFAELLO MARTINELLI
Bishop of Frascati
“We want to offer all the elements we have acquired. We want to document them seriously and make them available to those who will weigh them and make a decision.”

MSGR. ANGELO AMATI
Episcopal Delegate of Diocesan Tribunal
“The investigation has looked at Chiara's life, virtues, charism and specific spirituality, along with the theological themes presented. These included unity, Jesus forsaken and Jesus at the center. There was also the foundation of the Focolare Movement and the interconfessional and interreligious contacts.”

MARIA VOCE
President of the Focolare Movement
“We are happy that the Church will study and verify the life and virtue of our beloved Chiara, Servant of God. We will wait with a humble spirit for the Holy Father's decision. We ask God that her sainthood be for His glory and the good of many. We hope that in acknowledging Chiara's exemplary life, humanity will experience new developments of peace, unity and universal fraternity.”

The Vatican has a lot of work to do with the vast amount of materials gathered.

Chiara Lubich played a crucial role in the Catholic Church in the 20th century. She founded the Focolare Movement in 1943.

While World War II was taking lives, she saw fraternity was capable of overcoming any evil. She called it the “spirituality of unity.”

ROME REPORTS got the chance to talk to Chiara during one of her final public appearances. It was during the start of the beatification process for the Focolare Movement's co-founder, Igino Giordani.

June 6, 2004
“What does this mean? I feel great joy. I was moved when I found out about the process. It's perhaps one of the greatest joys I've had in my life, among the most beautiful.

What was his greatest virtue? 

The main virtue I recognized in him was love. Love toward God and his fellow neighbors.”

Chiara Lubich died in the city of Rocca di Papa, near Rome, in 2008.

Her life continues to inspire millions of people who participate in the spirituality she started in 182 countries around the world.

Javier Martínez-Brocal / Claudia Torres