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Religious Persecution: Family of slain Pakistani minister, meets with Pope Francis

The mother and brother of a Pakistani Christian minister, who was murdered because of his faith, met with Pope Francis. The son of 87 year old Marta, Shabaaz Bhatti, was killed in his native country, where as a Catholic he was part of the  minority. Now, his family is making sure his legacy lives on.  PAUL BHATTI  Brother of Shabaaz Bhatti "The Pope was very touched and moved. He closed his eyes, held my mom's hand tightly and hugged her. That speaks volumes.â?  His brother, Shabaaz, was Pakistan's Minister of Minorities. He strongly opposed the country's blasphemy law which criminalizes critiques against Islam. In many cases, the law is used to wrongfully accuse people. It's often used as a tool for personal vendettas against Christians and other minorities. Shabazz killed in 2011, by Muslim extremists.  With religious persecution on the rise, Bhatti, who held his brother's government post after he was assassinated, says the current violence in Iraq and Pakistan is much more complicated than it seems.  PAUL BHATTI  Brother of Shabaaz Bhatti "What's going on in Iraq and Pakistan and other parts of the world, is not solely based on religion. They are terrorists who are using religion as a tool to reach their personal goals. In Pakistan, I've met good Muslims who have supported me as minister.â? At the same time, he fears that radicalized Muslims will turn Pakistan into another Iraq, where persecution and lawlessness seems to have taken over.  PAUL BHATTI  Brother of Shabaaz Bhatti "That is a possibility, because you're dealing with Muslim terrorists who are also attacking other Muslim minorities. First we have to identify what is triggering this violence, discrimination and division and why people are ultimately being killed.â?  To prevent hatred, he says, education and inter-religious dialogue is key, especially in younger generations.  PAUL BHATTI  Brother of Shabaaz Bhatti "When children are raised under a radical ideology, and they grow up with suicide bombers, they too become victims of violence. We must help these children.â?  Bhatti says he and his family are still threatened by extremists. So much so, that he's been forced to live between Pakistan and Europe. He says he doesn't feel a sense of revenge over the murder of his brother. Instead, he says he wants to devout his time helping those who cannot defend himself, just like his brother Shahbaz did before he was killed.  AC/KLH  MG  JM -PR  up: PM