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Pope Francis at Santa Marta: How much time do we spend judging others at lunch?


During his homily at Casa Santa Marta, while it was snowing in Rome, Pope Francis reminded that people judge a lot and forgive little. 

POPE FRANCIS
“When we're at a meeting, a meal, whatever, let's imagine it's two hours long. Of those two hours, how many minutes have we spent judging others? Be merciful as your Father is merciful.”

The pope recommended asking God for His mercy out of our own shame, recognizing that we are sinners. 

EXCERPTS FROM THE POPE'S HOMILY
(Source: Vatican News)

“When we're at a meeting, a meal, whatever, let's imagine it's two hours long. Of those two hours, how many minutes have we spent judging others? This is the 'no.' Maybe it's the 'yes.' Be merciful. Be merciful like your Father is merciful. Better yet, be generous. Give and you shall receive. What will be given to me? A good measure, full and brimming. The abundance of the Lord's generosity, when we are full of the abundance of our mercy to not judge.”

“We know that God's justice is mercy. It's necessary to say it, though: 'Yours is justice; ours is shame.' When God's justice meets our shame, that's where forgiveness is. Do I believe I have sinned against the Lord? Do I believe the Lord is just? Do I believe He is merciful? Am I ashamed in front of God, of being a sinner? It's that simple: Yours is justice, mine is shame. Ask for the mercy out of shame.”

“Shame is a great grace. Remember: one's attitude toward his or her neighbor, remember the way by which I judge him or her, I will also be judged; I mustn't judge. If I say something about the other person, may it be generous, with as much mercy. The attitude before God, this essential dialogue: 'Yours is justice, mine is shame.'”