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Rome Reports

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Card. Ranjith cries in front of journalists, remembering victims of Sri Lanka attacks


While in Rome, Sri Lankan Cardinal Malcolm Ranjith recalled the terrible consequences of bombs that exploded in three churches in his country on Easter Sunday.

Through tears, he remembered the more than 300 who died, the terrible pain the wounded experienced and all those who lost relatives.

CARD. MALCOLM RANJITH
Archbishop of Colombo (Sri Lanka)
"There is a husband who has lost his wife and three children. When I went to visit him, he told me that before, when he returned from work, all three children ran to the door to greet him. Today, there is no one, only the empty house. He is left alone."

The cardinal explained he will meet with the pope to tell him about the situation in the country.

After the attacks, he visited the mosques in the area to transmit peace to the country and avoid any type of retaliation.

CARD. MALCOLM RANJITH
Archbishop of Colombo (Sri Lanka)
"I asked the Catholics, and the Buddhists and everyone else, not to raise their hand against Muslims. Because it is clear that the Muslim community had nothing to do with this."

The cardinal intervened during a presentation for Aid to the Church in Need. The foundation explained to press how in 2018 they spent 111 million euros they received from their donors.

THOMAS HEINE-GELDERN
Executive President, Aid to the Church in Need
"The projects are pastoral projects in order to support the persecuted, suffering Church where they don't fit the means to profit the mission and also to give a voice to the voiceless Church."

Aid to the Church in Need began 72 years ago. It supports five thousand projects, helping Christians in 140 countries.

The Sri Lankan Cardinal wanted to thank them for what the foundation is doing for their people in these difficult times.